Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Get Back To Fundamentals: Coverages

Here for your reference archives – basic examples of the types of coverages everyone runs; 1-high to 2-high.  For more information, click on the hyperlinks/tags of each coverage type for previous entries for more in-depth explanations of what you’re seeing.




Backer force

Safety support

Corner support


COVER 5 (2 Man Under)

Unrelated to everything.... Just passing along an interesting development in artistry.....something interesting is afoot with one of our time's most creative storytelling voice, David Simon (and company).  Simon, of "The Wire" fame (and brilliant treatment of "The Corner" and "Generation Kill"), is deep in his current passion; the unique Americana invention of New Orleans music told through its principle actors (the musicians). The visual-novel of  "Treme" nearing the end of its second season has become an acquired taste for many.  Those missing out on the brilliance in its subtleties (it isn't meant to be swallowed whole, but savored by digesting each scene) of scenes and dialogue are losing sight of what the series (and Simon's craft) is about. I felt it was worth noting as the appreciation of performance art (and original storytelling) is becoming a dying craft.  Perhaps best summarized here by actor Clarke Peters.
My point in offering these thoughts is to pass along an observation of the use of technology as the social apparatus of our time.  The series (like any other event) is being chronicled online in various blogs.  One of which, Back of Town ,  has become a way of appreciating the episodes with many people responsible for telling this story.  With regular, affable interaction with (the real) Davis Rogan, Tom Piazza, David Simon, and Eric Overmyer and from the perspective of a 1-to-1 relationship (and not that of a lecturer or host), giving participants the organic feeling of being involved in the actual process.  This type of discourse wouldn't have been possible even five years ago - its exciting to watch this process develop, especially in the environment that this series has found itself in; a humble and artistic community of writers with a production geared for the exact opposite [commercial] appeal of its on-air counterparts.  I'm not sure what will come of it, nor am I star-struck that the production team would interact with consumers, but how it shapes the course of artist-audience relationship is something to watch.

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